Two weeks to a leaner, cleaner body

My no-fuss strategy for evicting stored toxins in less than 30 days

An effective detoxification strategy can transform your health in countless ways. Provided you don’t do what I did years ago.

This is going to sound drastic. (It was.) But I went on my first detox by accident when I was trying to lose weight as a teen. For Lent, I decided to give up food—yes, all food—for the entire 40 days leading up to Easter.

My mother was horrified, obviously. And my grades in school suffered. Frankly, I was lucky I didn’t wind up in the hospital.

Still, I can’t say that nothing good came out of it.

Let’s be clear: I never should have fasted for such a long time. But after the first few days, I have to admit, I felt amazing and had tons of energy. And when all was said and done, it accomplished what I wanted—which was 60 pounds gone.

Needless to say, my opinions on healthy detox practices have changed significantly since then. For one thing, I would never want you to follow in my teenage footsteps. Though unfortunately, I’m sure many misguided people do.

And that’s why I think it’s high time we talked about the right way to deal with stored up toxins in your body.

Patients ask me about this subject constantly. And if they’re asking, then I am sure you’re wondering about it, too. I spent a fair amount of time discussing why detox is so important back in the May issue.

So, with that introduction and my requisite cautionary tale out of the way, let’s dive right into the details.

First things first: It’s only 14 days

The detox program I recommend is a two week commitment.

That may seem like a long time. But it goes by incredibly quickly. And you’re going to feel so much better by the end of it that you probably won’t want to stop. (Though

I didn’t design this plan for long-term use. That honor goes to my New Hamptons Health Miracle.)

The program itself is really simple—there’s no fancy equipment or elaborate planning involved. Just six capsules and two shakes per day, along with one light dinner every evening. (I’ll get to the meals that I think work best for this in a bit.)

The only other product I would recommend during this program is a good probiotic. (I like Dr. Ohhira’s.) You should take one twice daily to help support the elimination phase and to promote bacterial balance during and after your cleansing regimen.

As for your other nutritional supplements, I recommend taking a brief hiatus from them while you’re detoxing. Personally, I like to give my body a break from nutritional supplements every once in a while. During a detox is the perfect time to do that.

Again, this will allow your body to focus solely on the work of eliminating the junk from your system. Once you’re done, of course, you can—and should— resume your normal supplement regimen.

However, you should continue any medications you may be taking. (It’s never a good idea to stop taking a medication abruptly). And of course, you should talk to your doctor before starting this or any detox regimen. (But be forewarned: Most mainstream physicians aren’t likely to have the first clue about detoxing. So don’t expect much in the way of brilliant feedback. It’s probably best to work with a naturopathic physician if you’re undertaking any serious detox regimen.)

I should also be clear that pregnant or lactating women should not do this cleanse. Neither should children, or anyone with a truly debilitating disease that isn’t well controlled.

But, quite frankly, anyone else can benefit from a thorough detox. In fact, there are a few types of patients for whom I immediately prescribe this regimen before we undergo any further work together. This includes people with chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, or chemical sensitivities and allergies.

And I always use it on my patients who are looking to jump start their weight loss programs, and on those who have been stuck in a cycle ofyo-yo dieting.

But even for people who just want to “clean house”—especially if you’re regularly exposed to chemical solvents by profession, or even just from frequent trips to the nail salon—the strategy I’m about to share can be a life-changer.

Safe, effective detox is a three-step process

The first phase of detoxification—literally, Phase I—is to modify toxins into substances that are water-soluble. Your body naturally contains a family of enzymes specifically designed for this process, called cytochrome P450. They reside in the membranes of healthy liver cells.

Obviously, this means that a compromised liver isn’t going to be as effective at initiating the first phase of detox. (Which doesn’t bode well for most Americans, considering the skyrocketing rates of fatty liver in this country.)

Phase 1 is a necessary step, since fat-soluble toxins can’t be cleared out of your body without it. But it’s also dangerous.

That’s because the intermediary end-products of Phase 1 detoxification are often more reactive than the toxins from which they were created. This is why Phase II detox is so critically important…

Phase II is called conjugation. And it’s exactly what it sounds like. Compounds,  like glutathione or amino acids, join with water-soluble toxins to neutralize them and prepare them for excretion.

All of this is in preparation for Phase III, which is called elimination. Again, this is also exactly what it sounds like. The neutralized, conjugated toxins are safely eliminated from your body through your urine, bile, and bowel movements.

Multiphase support in a single supplement

I used to recommend—and follow—a simple water fast for detoxification. But I just couldn’t deny all the new science out there that shows supporting your body’s natural elimination processes along will only yield better, faster results. This is why the market has exploded with all sorts of detox supplements. So how do you choose the right one?

A good detox product will include ingredients that support all three of the critical phases I outlined above. Unfortunately, many of the ones you’ll find on the shelves of your local vitamin shop don’t offer complete support. And since detox is such an important part of both achieving good health and maintaining it, I wanted to be able to offer my patients a product they—and I—could trust. So I’ve spent the past few months working to formulate one. And I’m proud to say that my new Detox Logic formula is finally ready.

I made sure Detox Logic has everything you need to make my two-week detox protocol as efficient and effective as possible. And the first thing it needed was reliable liver support. Milk thistle is typically the go- to herb for liver support. But it’s important to make sure it contains enough of one particular compound, called silymarin.

This natural compound  is easily your strongest ally when it comes to supporting your liver health. Volumes of research support silymarin’s ability to protect your liver on the cellular level, boosting both membrane stability and antioxidant defense.1-2

I included an ultra-bioavailable, patented form of silymarin called Siliphos® in Detox Logic. And I was also able to find ultra-bioavailable forms of grapeseed extract and curcumin to add as well. Both of these ingredients offer additional antioxidant support. Which is critical to help keep free radical byproducts from Phase I detoxification in check.3-4 Curcumin also plays double-duty by helping to promote bile flow.5

Detox Logic also includes a comprehensive dose of conjugating amino acids to help bind toxins. But I also added another unique ingredient—a green algae called broken cell wall chlorella, noted for its ability to bind with heavy metals.6

(However, please don’t confuse this detox program with a heavy metal detox. I use an entirely different approach for that, which I briefly touched on in the last issue, and may revisit again in the future.)

Last, but certainly not least, my detox formula needed to offer targeted elimination support. And that starts with probiotics and prebiotics. (Prebiotics are food for all that good bacteria.) Detox Logic includes five billion colony-forming units (CFUs) of gut-strengthening Bacillus coagulans and burdock—an abundant source of the prebiotic inulin.7

But again, I recommend taking a probiotic like

Dr. Ohhira’s as part of this protocol as well, to furnish your gut with a large variety of bacteria. Diversity makes for a stronger gut environment. But including all of these strains into one detox supplement just wouldn’t have been practical.

I also added two more herbs—uva ursi leaf and stinging nettle—to help your urinary tract and kidneys flush out metabolic waste.8-9

Like I said, this formula keeps all of your body’s natural detox mechanisms covered. But following a specific diet during your detox will help your body do its job even more efficiently.

Get clean on three “meals” a day

As I mentioned above, until recently, my detox style was pretty bare bones. I would do a water cleanse—meaning I drank nothing but water, for seven whole days—twice per year.

Needless to say, this is a bit more draconian than most people can handle. I completely understand that. Which is why my current recommendations make provisions for three meals a day—albeit very modest ones.

Breakfast and lunch consist of a no-frills whey protein shake. Just take a scoop of WheyLogic and mix it with water, or blend it with water and plain ice to make a smoothie. This will provide a boost of protein and fiber, to help keep you fueled and take the edge off of your hunger.

Dinner is a small meal. I’ve designed five different options to take the guesswork out of meal planning. (See the table below.)

No, there’s not much to these meals. But I’m not asking you to eat this way forever. (Nor would I want you to.)

These small combinations promote elimination and provide plenty of water. And that’s exactly why I chose them.

As for what to drink, the only thing I recommend (aside from the juices included in the meals) is water. If you really need your coffee or tea, then go ahead—but please, keep it black.

Two weeks to a whole new you

So let’s go over this one more time for good measure: You take two capsules of Detox Logic three times per day on an empty stomach. You take a dose of Dr. Ohhira’s twice daily on an empty stomach.

(An hour before or 90 minutes after a meal—morning and evening probably works best for this.) Then you mix up some WheyLogic for breakfast and lunch.

And you eat one of the dinners I outlined to the left every evening.

That’s all you do, for two weeks—preferably twice a year. It’s pretty simple stuff. But trust me, the payoff is major.

I’ve been using this detox protocol in my practice for the past few months. And my only regret is not developing it sooner.

My patients have been reporting all sorts of benefits…Everything from more energy and vitality to weight loss and even improved sleep. But perhaps most importantly, patients who detox experience significant decreases in inflammation.  Something that, as I’ve mentioned many times here before, affects every single part of your body in a very serious way.

Best of all, there are no real side effects. Some patients have experienced some diarrhea at the beginning. Some get constipated (which isn’t really constipation at all, simply a smaller bulk of stool as the two weeks progress). But both are perfectly normal and safe.

Bottom line, this program has a lot of unique components that you won’t find in any other product or formulation. But the proof is in the pudding. So let me share a quick patient story with you…

Earlier this month, I saw a patient who had visited a number of doctors, both conventional and integrative, for help with her persistent pain and fatigue. I’d been treating her for about a year with some success.

But I decided she would be one of my first patients to “test out” this new detox protocol. (I always figure that if something will help my most difficult cases, it will help almost anyone.)

To make a long story short, by the time she finished this detox, she looked like a whole new person. She’d lost eight pounds. The color had returned to her face. And she was even talking about going back to work—something that she thought she’d have to give up forever.

You just can’t argue with results like that.

The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Detox Logic is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 

Take the guesswork out of meal planning

Your five detox dinner options…

OPTION 1
•  8 oz. broiled white meat chicken
•  8 oz. (or one can) of stewed tomatoes
•  4 oz. prune juice

OPTION 2
•  8 oz. broiled steak over small salad without dressing
•  6 oz. pineapple juice

OPTION 3
•  6 oz. tuna or salmon pan seared in 1 tbsp. macadamia nut oil
•  1 cup green beans
•  ½ small apple

OPTION 4
•  6 oz. pork cut into strips, 1 tbsp. soy sauce,1 scallion (green part only), 1 clove garlic (crushed), and 2 tbsp. macadamia nut oil. Heat oil in skillet, then add ingredients and stir fry until pork is cooked through, about 5 minutes.
•  Small green salad without dressing
•  4 oz. unsweetened applesauce

OPTION 5
•  2 hard-boiled eggs
•  1 zucchini, 1 cup green beans, 1 small head of cauliflower, all steamed
•  4 oz. tomato juice

 

Sources:

1. Féher J, et al. Curr Pharm Biotechnol. 2012 Jan;13(1):210-7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21466434

2. Kidd P, et al. Altern Med Rev. 2005 Sep;10(3):193-203. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16164374

3. Nuttall SL, et al. J Clin Pharm Ther. 1998 Oct;23(5):385-9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9875688, http://www.phytosomes.info/public/leucoselect_phytosome.asp#references

4. Sharma OP. Biochem Pharmacol. 1976 Aug 1;25(15):1811-2.
http://www.sabinsa.com/newsroom/paper_curcumin.html

5. Tokaç M, et al. Food Chem Toxicol. 2013 Jan 29.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23376509

6.  Georgiou, G. “The discovery of a unique natural heavy metal chelator.” Explore! Volume 14, Number 4, 2005. http://www.heavymetaldetox.net/Explore%20Article%20on%20HMD.pdf

7. Hun L. Postgrad Med. 2009 Mar;121(2):119-24. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19332970

8. Head KA. Altern Med Rev. 2008 Sep;13(3):227-44. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18950249

9. Yarnell E. World J Urol. 2002 Nov;20(5):285-93. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12522584


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